PAMYCAKES

i love boring things
In flames I sleep soundly
With angels around me #rideordie

In flames I sleep soundly
With angels around me #rideordie

I love you more then ever,more than time and more then love

I love you more then ever,more than time and more then love

mol-bay:

Jack White with lightning-struck tree
"I can’t remember who took this Polaroid of me and this rather stationary tree, but I do remember why we took it. I saw lightning strike this tree in my front yard the night before. It was incredible and terrifying. I was on my front porch just trying to watch the rain but stay out of harm’s way when lightning struck that tree right in front of me about fifty yards away. It’s hard to move when you see something like that. It’s probably the harshest warning you could receive, maybe harsher than someone firing a gun in the air because you might have a chance of talking your way out of that. But lightning? It dug the ground up a bit in front of the tree for about ten feet, which you can’t see in this picture. But damn I was well dressed that next morning, huh? Must’ve been scared straight, trying to get my act together. Oh, also, lightning has struck my front yard two OTHER times that I know about, and I have seen—and heard—the damage from indoors, not like that first time where I was naive enough to think I could sit on my porch like Grandpa Jones and whittle while the rain fell all around me and not worry about miniscule things like fate, and heavenly retribution, and so forth. Also, as a side note; what does “thunderstruck” mean? Knocked over by sound? Hmmm… "- Jack White

mol-bay:

Jack White with lightning-struck tree

"I can’t remember who took this Polaroid of me and this rather stationary tree, but I do remember why we took it. I saw lightning strike this tree in my front yard the night before. It was incredible and terrifying. I was on my front porch just trying to watch the rain but stay out of harm’s way when lightning struck that tree right in front of me about fifty yards away. It’s hard to move when you see something like that. It’s probably the harshest warning you could receive, maybe harsher than someone firing a gun in the air because you might have a chance of talking your way out of that. But lightning? It dug the ground up a bit in front of the tree for about ten feet, which you can’t see in this picture. But damn I was well dressed that next morning, huh? Must’ve been scared straight, trying to get my act together. Oh, also, lightning has struck my front yard two OTHER times that I know about, and I have seen—and heard—the damage from indoors, not like that first time where I was naive enough to think I could sit on my porch like Grandpa Jones and whittle while the rain fell all around me and not worry about miniscule things like fate, and heavenly retribution, and so forth. Also, as a side note; what does “thunderstruck” mean? Knocked over by sound? Hmmm… "- Jack White

(via kkempster)

astronomicalwonders:

An Arrangement of Planetary Nebulae
We all know what happens when stars die: they explode. But what does it look like? The image show 4 different explosions of this sort. When a star explodes in this way it becomes a planetary nebula. A planetary nebula is a type of emissions nebula that is caused by the expand shell of ionized gas caused by the initial explosion. The ionized gas glows and gives creates these beautiful structures that we observe. This Hubble image contains the planetary nebulae: He 2-47, NGC 5315, IC 4593, and NGC 5307. 
Credit: NASA/Hubble

astronomicalwonders:

An Arrangement of Planetary Nebulae

We all know what happens when stars die: they explode. But what does it look like? The image show 4 different explosions of this sort. When a star explodes in this way it becomes a planetary nebula. A planetary nebula is a type of emissions nebula that is caused by the expand shell of ionized gas caused by the initial explosion. The ionized gas glows and gives creates these beautiful structures that we observe. This Hubble image contains the planetary nebulae: He 2-47, NGC 5315, IC 4593, and NGC 5307.

Credit: NASA/Hubble